How Publishers’ Data Policies Inform, Support and Encourage Authors to Share

Last week our team published a new case study in the journal Insights outlining how two publishers, Springer Nature and Taylor & Francis, have developed and implemented research data policies for their journals.

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Apr 02, 2019
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Since 2016, academic publishers have begun to roll out standard research data policies to encourage (or mandate) authors to share the data underpinning their published papers. Standard data policies can replace bespoke or informal data sharing requirements, and create consistency for the authors who are being asked to comply with them.

Developing a suite of data policies that are appropriate for every discipline and every journal isn’t straightforward, and at Springer Nature we have documented our approach, as well as openly licensing our policy text for reuse. Creating the policies is only the first step however – they have to be implemented, to be communicated to authors, and to be enforced.

Our new case study describes data policy implementation projects at both Springer Nature and Taylor & Francis, focusing on four topics: authors’ readiness to share data; author reactions data sharing requirements; how authors are made aware of their obligations; and the impact of mandatory data availability statements. We also look to the future and other work currently being undertaken to further align data sharing policies, particularly the Research Data Alliance’s Data Policy Standardisation and Implementation Interest Group.

You can read the paper in Insights, written by Leila Jones (Taylor & Francis) and Rebecca Grant and Iain Hrynaszkiewicz (Springer Nature) here: Implementing publisher policies that inform, support and encourage authors to share data: two case studies.

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Rebecca Grant

Research Data Manager, Springer Nature

I am Springer Nature's Research Data Manager, having previously worked as digital archivist at national public institutions and a national repository in Ireland. I have a background in the humanities, and I am currently undertaking a part-time PhD which is investigating the connections between archival science and research data management. My main areas of interest are in best practices and standards in data management, with a focus on digital preservation. I am also qualified in project management and Open Data training, and I will be contributing to training and guidance for authors and editors in the next year.

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